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I'm attempting to figure out throughput for a specific application. In my capture I am filtering on the TCP stream and then using Statistics > Protocol Hierarchy.

Am I correct in using the Bit/s column for Transmission Control Protocol as my application throughput for that stream?

asked 22 Mar '16, 12:14

sudoraptor's gravatar image

sudoraptor
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accept rate: 0%

Possibly, but you have to check the following factors:

  • some competing traffic may exist on the network between your application and its clients, causing the request rate to the application to be lower than it could be, i.e. the actual throughput of your application may be higher if you could "ask for more". This is if the application sends responses to requests.

  • the client of your application may throttle its output by indicating a small receive window. This is if the application sends a continuous stream as a response to a single request.

  • there must be no packet loss between the application and its clients, as then again the Bit/s value would be skewed and the actual throughput of the application throttled by the TCP stack's retransmissions of the lost packets.

So without more details about the expected behaviour of the application and of what exactly you mean by "throughput", it is hard to answer properly.

(22 Mar '16, 13:30) sindy
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question asked: 22 Mar '16, 12:14

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last updated: 22 Mar '16, 13:30

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